How to use Case Comments with Communities in the Service Console Feed View & Salesforce1

This past week I had someone who is looking to use Case Comments in the Service Cloud, but wanted it to be listed as an Action in the Feed.  I thought it would be a good use case of many different tools within Salesforce being used together.  I am looking at possibly doing this with code and basing it off this post, but for now I figured that I’de show you how without code.  Let me be clear that if you’re not using a Community that you can simply use the Internal Comments field instead without having to do anything.  The only negative of going with this solution is that you’re not going to have your Case Comment Chatter Post visible until your Chatter feed is refreshed, but that is something that also happens with the Internal Comments field.  The Case Comment record is visible instantly.  And this works nicely with Salesforce1.  With that said, let’s jump right in!

Automation Overview:

  1. Inputs for Case Comment received (Action)
  2. Process Builder triggered (Pass inputs into Visual Flow)
  3. Case Comment created in Flow

For this solution we have two different options in how we can do it architecturally:

  1. Record Create – Create new Custom Object
  2. Record Create – Create new Task Record
  3. Record Update – Use Custom Fields on Account/Opportunity

For me, because of not wanting to further complicate the Task Object and not wanting to add excess fields to the Case Object, I’m going to go with option 1 and create a new Custom Object.

How will we build this?

  1. Create the Case Comment Extension Object
  2. Create our Visual Flow to create the Case Comment
  3. Create our Process Builder to launch the Visual Flow
  4. Create our Action on the Case

For this solution we have two different options in how we can do it architecturally:

  1. Record Create – Create new Custom Object
  2. Record Create – Create new Task Record
  3. Record Update – Use Custom Fields on Account/Opportunity

For me, because of not wanting to further complicate the Task Object and not wanting to add excess fields to the Case Object, I’m going to go with option 1 and create a new Custom Object.

What fields do we need create in this Custom Object?

  1. Auto Number
  2. Case (Master-Detail)
  3. Comment (Long Text Area)
  4. Public (Checkbox) Note: this only applies if you have a Customer Community.

CaseCommentExtensionObject

Let’s get our Flow created first since we can’t Activate the Process Builder without it  (Setup | Create | Workflows & Approvals | Flows).

NewFlow.jpg

The first step is going to be grabbing our Record Create.

RecordCreate1.jpg

We now need to create the variables we will use to create the Case Comment.

Case Id

CaseCommentParentIdVariable

IsPrimary (This is a BOOLEAN, not Text)

CaseCommentIsPublishedVariable

CommentBody

CaseCommentBodyVariable

Lets make sure everything is correctly mapped inside our Record Create.

CaseCommentCreation

Great!  So lets hit OK and set this as our Starting Element.

SetAsStartElementCaseComment

Now lets drag in our Record Delete.  This is so that we don’t add useless data into Salesforce.

RecordDeleteDrag

Create a variable for the Record Id of the Custom Object record we just created, when our Action is used.

var_CaseCommentExtensionId

Map it in our Record Delete.

DeleteCaseCommentExtension

Connect the elements together to finish our Flow.

FinishedFlow

And lastly we want to Save and then Activate our Flow!

SaveCaseCommentFlow

ActivateCaseCommentFlow

Fantastic!  Now we need to setup our Process Builder that fires this Flow.  So lets go create a new Process Builder for this.  (Setup | Create | Workflows & Approvals | Process Builder)

CaseCommentExtensionPBCreation

We want the Process Builder to fire on our Custom Object that we created, Case Comment Extension, and we want it to fire only when a record is created.

CaseCommentExtensionPB1

We don’t need to set any criteria here, but to be safe let’s just make sure that we have a Case ID and Comment before proceeding.

CaseCommentExtensionPB2

Now we need to map the variables in our Flow to the Values in the Custom Object, using the Type Reference.

CaseCommentExtensionPB3

Hit Save, then Activate your Process Builder. Now, lets navigate to go create our Action.

CaseCommentActionNewButton

Keep it on the default, Create a Record, and select Case Comment Extension (our Custom Object we created earlier).

CaseCommentAction1

Let’s make sure we turn off the Create Feed Item, so we don’t spam the Chatter Feed since the Case Comment itself will cause a Feed Item to be created.  Also, make sure we add in a nice Success Message and custom Icon to make the action look sharp!

CaseCommentAction2

Remove the Case Field and drag Public and Comment into the Action’s Page Layout.  Make sure you require the Comment field.

CaseCommentAction3

It will give you a small popup warning you about not having the Case field on the Layout, but you can ignore it and move on.

CaseCommentAction4

We now need to setup a Predefined Field Value for our Case field.

CaseCommentAction5

Set Case.Id to our custom Case field.

CaseCommentAction6

Now all that is left is for us to update our layout(s)!

CaseCommentActionToLayout

And with that, lets take a look at the finished product!

CaseCommentAction.png

Five Best Practices for Building a Clean Visual Flow

We’ve all been there, where you’re learning to write your first Visual Flow.  The main thing we’re focused on is just making sure that it is functional.  That’s fine while you are in your Sandbox developing, but once you’ve got it working correctly you need to make sure your Flow follows these five best practices.

Elements are Organized

One of the top rules for writing code is using proper indentation.  David Liu (SFDC99) is known for his love (or OCD) of clean code.  Visual Flow’s equivalent to indentation is the alignment of the elements into a clean format.  Think of it like you’re having company over – you would make sure you cleaned your house up before they arrived.

Your Flow should be very easy for you to follow the Flow Elements from start to finish without having to strain your eyes.  Keeping it clean also lets your Flow be easier to make future updates to it.  You don’t have to take apart your Flow to make sure you didn’t miss anything on your update.  So, be sure you spend the extra minute or two to make sure your Flow is sharp looking!

Bad

Messy Flow

Good

Sharp Flow

Naming Convention

In the developer realm, camel Case is the standard.  In Flow, we’re stepping into the developer world without really having to write code.  It obviously isn’t required that you use camel Case as your naming convention, but it is important that you follow a consistent naming convention.  If you don’t, your Flow will be much harder to read.

camel.png

Variable Names

In addition to your naming conventions, you need to make sure your variable names make sense.  I have opened up way too many Flows that use variable names that are not clear. If someone has to do some detective work to figure out what your variable is doing, you need to rethink your variable naming.  Variable naming can often be hard to do correctly, because you have to summarize the function of the variable into a small concise variable.

DoCaseId — Don’tRecordId

Why? RecordId is very generic and does not tell me what Object it is referring to.  I would have to go find where the value was assigned to see the Object it is the Id for.  CaseId is clear and I don’t have to do any research to figure out what it is.

Fault Messages

When your Flow fails its important for everyone to be alerted.  If you’re a Solo Admin, then you can technically get away without using a Fault Message, because Salesforce’s Email Alert will go to you.  However, if you have more than one person developing in your Org, this is a requirement! By setting up a Fault Message, you can easily alert all of the Admins and Developers of the issue.

It is also important to use multiple Fault Messages inside your Flow.  You’re able to customize the Email being sent out to provide specific information that pertains to that particular part of your Flow.  This will help you as you troubleshoot your Flow.

Fault Message

 

Descriptions

Make sure you use Descriptions in your Visual Flow.  This goes along with having your Flow Elements all aligned and easy to read.  You want your Flow to be easily digestible.  It is important to not write blatantly obvious Descriptions, just to write them.  You want to make your Descriptions helpful.

Anytime you have to do something unique inside your Flow you should include a Description to explain what, and more importantly why.  An example would be when you use a Formula in your Flow.

Description.png

 

 

Recap: Think long term when you’re building your Flows (or anything).  Just like you want to create a good User Experience for your End Users, make sure you create a good one for the Admins & Developers that are maintaining the Org.  None of these best practices require a significant amount of time to follow, and the benefits of having a clean Flow will be worth the extra effort!  And if you’re still reading, make sure you check out my The 6 Most Common Visual Flow Errors to Avoid.

 

 

How to work with Related Records in Process Builder Criteria

When Process Builder first came out, the lack of error messages made it hard to adopt.  I have noticed from looking at the Salesforce Answers Community, confusion with Process Builder errors is a very common.  In this post, we will cover one of the most common mistakes for someone learning Process Builder – how to work with related records.

What do I mean by related records?

Anything that is referenced through a Lookup Field on an Object (including System fields like Created By).

lookupfield.jpgWhen you’re working inside Process builder, you’ll see a chevron next to any related object that you can navigate to.  This lets you then reference the fields of that Object in your Criteria and Actions.

RelatedRecords

This works like a charm, until you decide to have a Process Builder reference a Lookup Field that is not populated (so the value is null).

failed.jpg

Yikes!  We never want to see that error stopping an End User from saving a record!  What happened?  Salesforce will tell you in your Fault message (emailed), the variable “hasn’t been set or assigned.”  What does that really mean though?

You were trying to reference a related record, but your Lookup Field does not have a value or record in it.  This isn’t documented very well, and is an easy mistake almost everyone will make as they learn to use Process Builder.  This is a new problem for Admins, because we do not run into this issue with Formula Fields and Field Updates (in a Workflow Rule).  And, this is a serious problem because it actually can affect an End User’s ability to make a new record and/or edit an existing record.

So now that we know the problem, how do we fix it?

  1. Check for Null
  2. Formula Field

Checking for Null is the approach that I prefer to go with.  Either one can technically work, but I choose to keep my Objects as simple as possible and avoid adding excess fields.

For our example, lets say that we wanted to run some automation for our Opportunity when the Primary Campaign is Type = Trade Show.   We’d first need to make sure that our Opportunity actually has a Campaign associated to it, otherwise we’d get that failed to execute the flow error.  So, how do we do it?

Campaign ID >  the Related Record, ability to reference Campaign Fields.

Campaign ID  the Campaign Lookup Field on the Opportunity.

CampaignLookup.jpg

 

That means that the Campaign ID Field houses the value of the Lookup.  Which means we can check to see if there actually is a value!

SelectCampaignId

CheckforNull

Now, we are able to add the rest of our conditions that reference our related Campaign record.

Note – we must to check for Is Null BEFORE we reference the related record’s fields.  Salesforce checks our criteria from Top to Bottom.

typetradeshow.jpg

We can now reference fields on related records in Process Builder because we first validated that we had a related record.

Understanding how to write Process Builder Criteria

I am working on a mini-series related to understanding Bulkification (related to Process Builder and Visual Flow).   So, you’re going to see a theme of posts like this and Building your Process Builder for Optimum Performance and Bulkification where I focus on some design considerations with Process Builder and Flow.  The reason behind these posts are because Process Builder and Flow are extremely powerful tools that give those previously developer-only powers to the masses.  And as we all know… with great power comes great responsibility!  So, lets do our part to make sure that we build our Process Builders and Flows in a way that would not cause developers headaches.  I’ll cover the basics of the different types of criteria, and then go over why it matters that you take building criteria seriously.

spiderman1.jpg

When setting the criteria for our Process Builder to fire, our options are:

  1. Conditions are met
  2. Formula evaluates to true
  3. No criteria – just execute the actions!

Lets dive deeper into each of these and talk about when and why would use them, and some of the common mistakes that are made around these.

Conditions are met

criteriapb.jpg

Using this as our criteria gives us a few more options than what we used to have with Workflow Rules criteria.  Now, we have operators like Is changed and Is null that were previously unavailable to us.  Outside of those new options it is essentially just a cleaner UI.  Don’t forget about the ability to make your Value a Formula (see condition #3), you can use awesome functions like PRIORVALUE and grab in cool System things like your Custom Settings!  Speaking of, Jennifer Lee has a great post on using Custom Settings in Process Builder that is a must read for anyone not familiar with Custom Metadata or Custom Settings!

Conditions.jpg

So we can pretty much do pretty much everything inside this criteria option… but what are the pitfalls that we will run into?

Forgetting to check the Advanced checkbox.

I really wish that Salesforce didn’t hide this section, it needs to be front and center!  I feel like this is one of the biggest errors that people make when building a Process Builder.  It is often overlooked until you’ve got a Process Builder that is creating a record or sending an email, and you realize that you’ve just had six emails get sent out to a Client!criteriaadvanced.jpg

Using Is changed

While I absolutely LOVE this operator that Salesforce gave us within Process Builder, the fact of the matter is I have seen tons of Success Community questions where people get stuck on this.  It isn’t documented very well that Is changed will ONLY run on Updates.  This will not run on Create.  That means, you’re up a creek without a paddle if you’re trying to build your Process Builder to only fire when a value changes, but also have it work if that field has been filled out on create.  If anyone has a clever way that they’ve found to bypass this issue, I’de love to hear it.

Formula evaluates to true

criteriapb2.jpg

While not as simple as the conditions are met option, this gives us the ability to do everything that we would want to do.  The problem is that this often is more fragile than the rest.

API Field Name Changes

This option unfortunately will NOT update your formula if you have to change the field name.  Keep this in mind, because just about everywhere else in the UI this is something we’re accustomed to.  You will however be greeted with a lovely error message anytime you try to Clone ur Update your Process Builder

errormsg.jpg

Is changed for new records works!! kinda…

Here is a simple example of how you could use the formula evaluates to run on new records and still run ischanged on updates.

We essentially have separated our criteria into On record create and On any updates.

(ISNEW() && NOT(ISBLANK(field)) || ISCHANGED(field)

In my below example I only have to use ISNEW() because the Case Status is always filled out.

ischanged.jpg

No criteria – just execute the actions!

criteriapb3.jpg

This should not be used unless you have a very good reason.  Just because we have a simple action does a Record Update and nothing else does not mean that we want it to always fire on every edit.  This means that every single edit our Process Builder is firing.  How many situations can you think of that actually require a Process Builder to fire every single time?  Don’t be a lazy Admin and use this option just because you can!

Why does this matter?

Because of how Salesforce ‘bulkifies’ our Process Builders and Flow!

bulk.jpg

https://releasenotes.docs.salesforce.com/en-us/winter16/release-notes/rn_forcecom_process_bulkification.htm

The issue is that as we continue to customize an Object with more and more Process Builders and Flows you keep adding to the string length!  Remember that every simple Record Update in your Process Builder, no matter how simple, counts as an actual query that will be added into that ‘bucket’.  Previously with Workflow Rules you never had to worry about those simple Field Updates running on every edit of the record, but now as we try to keep our Process Builders and Flows bulkified it becomes an issue!

By fully understanding our Process Builder’s criteria (and using it correctly), we are able to cut back on the extraneous actions.  This results in two big things:

  1. Reduced process time when you hit Create or Edit a record
  2. You’re more bulkified due to a decreased the number of queries

Which means you’re now the hero of your Org!

hero.jpg

How to use a Loop inside a Loop (in Flow)

This past week I saw multiple comments about using a Loops, and one in particular around doing a Loop inside of another Loop.  It is a pretty rare thing that you’ll do with Flow, because of the limits that you’re going to be dealing with, it is very easy to hit a wall with this solution.  Your second Loop is very inefficient, and has to run for every record that is found in the first Loop (which means a Fast Lookup/Query).  This SOQL queries limitation has been improved, prior to writing this blog I thought the limit was 50, but it seems Salesforce recently improved that limitation to 100.

So, keep your limits in mind when you begin to architect a solution like this.  Sometimes it can’t simply be done safely with Flow and you need to move to Apex.

limitsflow

Note: I know that you can add a Formula Field that brings the AccountID to the Campaign Member, but this is a simple example that gets the main point across.

Business Case:

  • When we lose a Client and mark them as a Former Client we want to remove all of their Contacts from all of their Campaigns

Process Overview:

  1. Account Record Meets Criteria – Process Builder triggered (Pass inputs into Visual Flow)
  2. Flow Finds ALL Contacts Associated to Account
  3. Flow Finds ALL Campaign Memberships for ALL Contacts
  4. Flow Deletes ALL Campaign Memberships for ALL Contacts

 

Now, because I’ve already done a post on Fast Lookups and Loops, I am not going to really dive into the individual pieces of this Flow.  I am going to give an outline of what each Element is doing, but I will only be focusing on the areas that are key to understanding how you can use a Loop inside of a Loop.

First, we are going to start out our Flow by looking for ALL of the Contacts related to our Account.  All we need to do is pass in our Account ID into the Flow so that we have that as a Filter.

First Element.jpg

FastLookup1.jpg

Next, we need to now Loop between each of the Contacts that we have found with our Fast Lookup, so to do that we need to drag in our Loop.

Second Element.jpg

Loop1.jpg

Now, this gets us to our Second Fast Lookup, which is where the magic happens.  In here, we simply need to take a step back and think about what we are trying to filter.  In this case I am trying to find all of the Campaign Memberships associated to a particular Contact (so that I can add them to a collection and then eventually delete them).  So, in my Fast Lookup I should be using my Looped Variable to bring in the Contact’s ID.

Third Element.jpg

FL in Loop 0.jpg

FL in Loop 1.jpg

Just like that, we are dynamically filtering this Fast Lookup for each Contact that comes into our Loop!  Pretty simple, right?  All that is left for us now is to setup our next Loop and talk about what we are doing there.

For each Campaign Membership our Contact has, we will be sending them through our next Loop.

Fourth Element.jpg

CampaignMember.jpg

Next, we want to assign the Loop Variable to another SObject Variable, our first step in creating a SObject Collection Variable.

Fifth Element.jpg

Assignment1

Now, we want to assign the SObject Variable to our SObject Collection Variable.

Sixth Element

Assignment2

So we just completed our Loop for the Campaign Memberships!  Awesome!  But, what happens when that Looped Contact has no more Campaign Memberships for us to Loop through?  This is where I’ve seen many people mess up there Flows (including myself every once and a while!), because there is typically a lot going around.  You need to correctly map your second/inside Loop to your first/outside Loop!  This is where we then repeat the process for every Contact that we had in our first Fast Lookup.

Loop to Loop.jpg

Great!  Now, all that is left is for us to determine what happens at the end of our First Loop.  In this scenario we want are sending them to a Fast Delete to get removed in bulk!

Seventh Element

FastDelete.jpg

Great, we are all set!  All that is left for us is to build our Process Builder to launch this Flow.

RECAP:  Loops inside of Loops are powerful features that can let bend the limits of Flow.  These should be used sparingly when you know your inside Loop won’t be used in a high enough volume that you’ll hit a transaction limitation with your Flow.  If you’re getting not confident that you’re going to stay away from that limitation, you should consider building this in Apex instead.  As you could imagine with a scenario like the one above, if we had any Accounts with upwards of 100+ Contacts we would be in some trouble! Beware of the limits!

How to let a non-Admin EASILY assign Permission Sets and/or Public Groups

Once and a while you get into the situation where you want a non-Admin User to manage a few specific Permission Sets and/or Public Groups.  Let me start this off by saying Delegated Administration is a fantastic option to use.  However, I’ve run into the scenario where that sometimes doesn’t do the trick.  If you’re dealing with someone non-technical this type of Admin work can be a difficult End User experience.  One of the most often times I do this is working with special permissions for Community Users.  That is because Community Users don’t even have Public Groups visible on their User Detail!  So, if the manager has administer more than type of group or assignment, it is easy for them to make a mistake.  So, how can we make this as easy of an experience as possible and help to reduce errors?

Simple, we use a Checkbox (and sometimes a Picklist)!

checklist

In this post we are going to go over my method of simplifying how you can assign Permissions by using a field on the User Object that any User can be given access to.  Let me reiterate why I do this:

  1. Makes it dummy proof.  It takes the thought out of the End User managing the Permission.  All your End User needs to do is Check or Uncheck a box (or select a different picklist value).  There is less of a chance for them to add or remove the wrong permission.
  2. A List View cam show your End User who has (or hasn’t) been given the permissions they’re assigning.  This makes it easy for them to see whose been given the appropriate access, and they don’t have to go into the Permission Set, Public Group, Queue, or Chatter Group to verify they’ve removed or added someone.
  3. Easier training for the Admin.  It isn’t as hard to train someone to check a box or use a picklist!

Ok, so now that we have established why I think this is a great solution, lets get rolling!

For this example we are going to go use a Checkbox to assign a Permission Set to a Community User.  The Permission Set will be granting access to our Knowledge Article Type that is only available for our Premier Support customers (similar to Salesforce’s Premier Support).  To do this, we need to create a Checkbox on the User Object, and make sure we only give access to the appropriate Users (assign via Profile or Permission Set).

Note: while we are only assigning a Permission Set in this example (to keep it simple), you can easily add on using this same blue print and swapping out the Object to whatever Object you need.

Automation Overview:

  1. User Record Meets Criteria – Process Builder triggered (Pass inputs into Visual Flow)
  2. Flow Checks to see if existing Permission Set Assignment
  3. Flow Determines if we add or remove the Permission Set Assignment
  4. Flow adds or removes the Permission Set Assignment

We will be creating:

  1. Premier Support [User Field – Checkbox]
  2. Flow to run our logic
  3. Process Builder to launch our Flow

So start off by creating your new Checkbox field

Premier Support.jpg

Now that we have our Premier Support Checkbox created, we can go create our Flow (Setup | Create | Workflows & Approvals | Flows).

NewFlow.jpg

The first step is going to be grabbing our Record Lookup.

Record Lookup1.jpg

We are going to be doing a Lookup on our Permission Set Assignment Object.  We want to see if we have a matching Permission Set Assignment or not.  We will want to setup our criteria, and set an ID if we find a Record.  To do so we will need to have these three variables created:

var_UserId – The Id of the User the Process Builder is triggered from (passed in from PB)

var_UserId.jpg

var_PermissionSetAssignmentId – The Id of the Permission Set Assignment, if the User has been assigned the Permission Set already.

var_PermissionSetAssignmentId.jpg

var_PermissionSetId – The Id of the Permission Set associated to Premier Support (passed in from PB)
var_PermissionSetId.jpg

This will give us a final Record Lookup that looks like this

Finished Record Lookup

Great, now lets set this as our Start Element

Set Start Element

Now, we need to setup a Decision to see if we need to add or remove the Permission Set assignment.  So, lets drag that out to our Canvas.

DragDecisionOut.jpg

We will need to have a variable for our Checkbox field.  So lets create that and call it var_PremierSupport.  Make sure you set it to the Type of Boolean.

var_PremierSupport.jpg

Now, lets setup our Decision Criteria.  The first one will be if we want to ADD the Permission Set to the User, we want to check to make sure the var_PremierSupport EQUALS TRUE and the var_PermissionSetAssignmentId IS NULL is TRUE

Add

The second one will be if we want to REMOVE the Permission Set from the User, we want to check to make sure the var_PremierSupport EQUALS FALSE and the var_PermissionSetAssignmentId IS NULL is FALSE

Remove

If for some reason we don’t meet either of those criteria, we are going to leave it be and let it exit the Flow (because something is wrong).

Note: You probably want to setup some sort of Fault email to be sent to yourself so that you know there was an issue (possibly an Admin assigning the Permission Set already), but hopefully that won’t ever happen.

Now, lets drag out our Record Delete.  This will be for when our record matches our Remove criteria.

Record Delete.jpg

This is an easy Element to setup.  We just have to select the Permission Set Assignment Object and then map our Id to the Id field.

DeletePermissionSetAssignment.jpg

After we save this Element, make sure you map your Decision to it with the Remove outcome.

Now, let us drag out a Record Create.  This will be for when our record matches the Add criteria.

DragRecordCreate.jpg

Great, now we just need to select our Permission Set Assignment Object and then map our var_UserId and var_PermissionSetId fields.

RecordCreate

Now, we need to map our Decision to the Record Create.

FinalFlow.jpg

Lastly we want to Save and then Activate our Flow!

SaveFlow

Note: I like to append “- Flow” to my Autolaunched Flows.  This makes things clearer when I am dealing with them on the backend since Flow and Process Builder both are in the Flow metadata folder.

ActivatedFlow.jpg

Fantastic!  Now we need to setup our Process Builder that launches this Flow.  So lets go create a new Process Builder for this.  (Setup | Create | Workflows & Approvals | Process Builder)

CreatePB

We want the Process Builder to fire on our Account, so for our object select User, and for starting the process select when a record is created or edited.

SetUserObject.jpg

Now we need to setup our Criteria.  Unfortunately an ISCHANGED function doesn’t run on new Cases.  So we have to break out the formula editor and use this formula:

(ISNEW() &&[User].Premier_Support__c = TRUE)  || (ISCHANGED([User].Premier_Support__c))

 

ActionCriteriaPB.jpg

Now we get to setup our Immediate Action of launching a Flow.  All we need to do is pass in our User Id(Reference), Premier Support (Reference), and Permission Set ID (String).

Note: we are to breaking my hard coding an Id rule for this example.  I would recommend that you pass in the Permission Set Name and query for the Permission Set ID in your Flow.  I am ignoring that because I want to keep this blog post simple.

Launch Flow

Hit Save, and then hit Activate up in the top right corner… and you’re done!

How to bypass User Permissions with Flow

Have you ever come across a permission limitation that you couldn’t solve using a Permission Set?  Every once and a while we get requirements that can test the limits of what we can technically do with Salesforce.  It might be a Field Level Security issue, or it might be a License limitation.  Before Process Builder was around, if you wanted to get by some sort of limitation like this, you had to write code.  Not anymore!  Process Builder runs in the context of the System.

So… when Visual Flow is that when its autolaunched by Process Builder, it too will run in the context of the System and not the Running User.  This means any Field Level Security, Profiles, Roles, or License type can essentially be ignored.  Think of an Autolaunched Flow as temporarily giving somebody temporary Admin access.  Where this can get interesting is when we start to think of all of the different ways we might use this!

ProcessBuilderIcon

Get creative!  You can do all sorts of cool things to bypass Licenses and Security  issues by using Autolaunched Flows.  Here are a two examples to get you thinking:

Site.com Guest User Access

In this scenario we want to send an email to our clients to propose that we close a Case, and in that email present them with a Yes and No button.  If they click the button you want the Case to properly react.  That means we need to have that button click send them to a specific URL (associated to our Site.com) with a unique parameter that matches to our Case.  The problem is we are unable to have an unauthenticated User edit a Case.  We can give the Site.com Guest User access to Create on a Custom Object, and have that Custom Object then trigger a Process Builder to run and find and edit the Case.  There are some obvious security issues, but they can be solved by building your parameter and Flow correctly.

Add and Remove Permission Sets and Public Groups

We want our Marketing Manager to be able to add and remove people to a Permission Set and/or Public Group.  We can create a Checkbox or Picklist on the User Object, and have an edit to that field trigger a Process Builder to launch our Flow where we either add or remove them to the Permission Set and/or Public Group.  Access to this field can be then controlled by a Permission Set or by Profile.  With this, we can essentially delegate any Admin function to any User without given them Admin privileges!